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You’ve heard it before. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. However, did you know that what you eat for breakfast can impact the rest of your day? A new study released by the British Journal of Nutrition explains that eating peanut butter or peanuts for breakfast contributes to the management of blood sugar for most of the day. Peanuts and peanut butter can help minimize hunger pangs and increase production of the hormone PYY, which is responsible for making you feel full.

The study “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycaemic response and appetite in obese women with type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” compared blood sugar levels and appetite levels of individuals who had consumed peanuts or peanut butter for breakfast versus those who did not. Levels were checked after three hours and again after lunch to measure blood sugar and fullness.
Compared to participants who did not consume peanuts or peanut butter, those who did reported lower hunger levels up to eight to 12 hours later and showed lower blood sugar levels after consuming a high-carbohydrate lunch.

Interestingly, peanut butter had a slightly stronger effect on lowering blood sugar because carbohydrates are absorbed into the body slower. Researchers explain that the high protein, high fibre and healthy oil in peanuts all work together to control blood sugar and keep us feeling fuller longer.

Protein and fibre are important aspects of a healthy diet and peanuts pack a punch! One ounce (28.35 grams) of peanuts serves eight grams of protein and 2.5 grams of fibre.

The good news is Canadians are already aware of the health benefits of peanuts and peanut butter. According to recent research completed by the Peanut Bureau of Canada and Leger Marketing, nine in ten Canadians stated that peanuts are high in protein and nutritious. And, 94 per cent of Canadians have peanuts or peanut butter in their household.

Hockey season is about to begin for kids, and parents are always looking for quick and convenient breakfast and snack ideas for pre- and post-game fuel-ups. If you own a restaurant, snack shop or a convenience store near hockey arenas or in residential areas with a high density of children, consider adding peanut butter sandwiches to your quick, grab-and-go meals section. Or, display single-serve peanuts close to the checkout for grab-and-go shoppers.

Sources: The Peanut Institute, Leger Marketing

Did You Know?

  • peanut
    The peanut is also called the earthnut, groundnut and goober pea.
  • did-you-know-2

    Peanuts are 100 per cent cholesterol-free and contain oleic acid, a heart-healthy source of unsaturated fat.

  • peanut-butter-jar
    Peanut butter was invented around 1890 as a health food for the undernourished.
  • peanut-protein
    The peanut contains more protein than any other nut.

Peanut Butter for the Hungry tasteUS

Peanut Bureau of Canada